The Bills Mafia co-founder spent about 13 seconds crying in a recent video, and the internet is still having a field day with it.

The “26 shirts” is a song that Bills Mafia Co-Founder, Del Reid, has been waiting for. The song was released on his birthday and he finally cried because of it.

It Only Took 13 Seconds for Bills Mafia Co-Founder, Del Reid, to Finally Cry

In 13 seconds, Patrick Mahomes ripped Buffalo Bills supporters’ hearts out. Del Reid, a veteran Bills supporter who coined the phrase “Bills Mafia” in a tweet in 2010, felt he’d seen everything. After seeing Scott Norwood’s failed Super Bowl field goal, the 46-year-old went through the “Music City Miracle.” This was the most painful loss for him.

Reid cried for the first time during a football game. Watching Mahomes drive the length of the field to eliminate his Bills was “like a stomach hit,” Reid told Sportscasting. Despite the humiliating defeat, Reid noted there was one bright spot after the game.

Del Reid had no clue what he was getting himself into when he typed ‘Bills Mafia’ in 2010.

Bills-Mafia-Del-1-1024x682

Bills-Mafia-Del-1-1024x682 On October 10, 2021, at GEHA, a young fan displays a Bills Mafia sign during an NFL football game between the Buffalo Bills and the Kansas City Chiefs. | Scott Winters/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images | Filed at Arrowhead Stadium in Kansas City, MO.

Former Bills wide receiver Stevie Johnson and ESPN Insider Adam Schefter were technically involved in the formation of the Bills Mafia. During an overtime defeat to the Pittsburgh Steelers in 2010, Johnson lost what would have been the game-winning touchdown pass. He turned to Twitter after the game to blame God.

Schefter shared Johnson’s tweet the next day, which Reid and many other Bills supporters felt was odd. Schefter, the man who breaks all the NFL news, was 24 hours late with this one, which was odd.

“It seemed a bit stupid to retweet it 20 or so hours later, and Bills fans pounced on (Schefter),” Reid told Sportscastng on Tuesday. “They were using the #schefterbreakingnews hashtag, and he blocked a lot of us.” I referenced the Bills Mafia and a group of folks who were blocked.

“Fans found it over time. It was found by the players. It simply kept growing and growing.”

Oh, my goodness, it’s grown a lot. The Bills Mafia has become the team’s public face. The Bills have trademarked the word, and Reid is still active in Mafia-related affairs.

“It’s all about community,” he continued, “watching out for one other.” “We’re a bunch of supporters that come out to show their support for the team and the community.”

After the Bills’ devastating defeat to the Chiefs, the Bills Mafia was shattered.

When the Bills flew to Kansas City, the Bills Mafia — notably Reid — watched emotions fly all over the place, as did most NFL fans. The Bills seemed to be on their way to the AFC championship game with 13 seconds remaining when Gabriel Davis grabbed his fourth touchdown pass of the game, giving the Bills a 36-33 lead and throwing Bills supporters into a frenzy.

Mahomes put the Chiefs in field-goal range two passes later, and Harrison Butker forced overtime. After winning the coin toss, the Chiefs marched down the field to victory.

Reid had never encountered a shattering moment like this before. It was just as painful for Reid’s teenage kids, who have also become Bills fans.

“One positive aspect of the epidemic is that I was able to watch every game with my children,” he added. “Both last year and this year, the Bills had fantastic seasons, and my girls were enthralled by the games.”

Because the Reid family was so committed in the squad, the devastating loss triggered a flood of emotions.

He added, “My daughter sobbed.” “My eldest daughter expressed her dissatisfaction with her current relationship.

“This is the first time I’ve cried during a Bills game.” I watched the Music City Miracle and Super Bowl 25 (Norwood’s missed kick). I was certain that this was going to be their year. It was nothing more than a gut hit that still stings.”

The Mafia is more than just a bunch of frenzied fans leaping over tables.

When people hear about the Buffalo Bills Mafia, the first picture that comes to mind is of a rowdy Bills fan breaking over a table at a tailgate party. While one branch of the Mafia does exist, there’s a lot more to it.

Reid and the Mafia believe in giving back to the community. The Mafia has been known to assist generate funds for players’ charities, most notably the Patricia Allen Fund, which was established in honor of Josh Allen’s grandmother, who passed away in November.

According to NBC Sports, the Mafia spearheaded a fund-raising effort that resulted in the opening of the “Patricia Allen Pediatric Recovery Wing” at the John R. Oishei Children’s Hospital after generating more than $1 million. Many of the funds were distributed in $17 increments, in honor of Allen’s jersey number.

Reid owns 26 Shirts, a firm that sells Buffalo-themed t-shirts and gives a portion of the proceeds to different organizations. The firm has raised $1,335,074 thus far. Reid said he started the business on a part-time basis, but when he lost his job, he went full-time with his wife’s consent. He’s been working full-time for the last six years, and he says “it grows larger every year.”

Others have been motivated by the Mafia to be charitable. Kansas City supporters borrowed a leaf from the Mafia playbook after their heartbreaking defeat to the Chiefs. They donated over half a million dollars to Oishei Children’s Hospital in $13 increments.

Reid isn’t interested in taking any of the credit. After typing “Bills Mafia” 12 years ago, he pinches himself with what has occurred.

He stated, “This will never cease being bizarre to me.” “This is something I’ll never get accustomed to.”

The defeat was heartbreaking, but Chiefs fans’ kindness alleviated some of the agony.

Reid said, “What goes around, comes around.” “It’s been a difficult week.” That’s a disappointing consolation prize.”

The Buffalo Bills were one of three teams Jim Kelly didn’t want to play for. RELATED: The Buffalo Bills Were One of Three Teams Jim Kelly Didn’t Want to Play For

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